Dangerous Creatures

Northern Dancer

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I hope everyone is doing super terrific in OutdoorBasecamp land.
The snow is gently falling in my neck of the woods. I've left my winter tent up for a while and when I get the urge I sleep out.

Is there anyone out there besides me that instructs camping skills? I'd Luv to compare notes and learn what you are doing.

I did a seminar on the most dangerous creatures that inhabit our forests. It was designed to dispel the myths that youth have about "dangers" and provide concrete information about managing issues in the wild.

Some might ask what are the most dangerous creatures we have? First of all, let's leave out the human aspect - we all know we can be nuts - right?

Grizzly Bears, Moose, Black Widow Spider, Prairie Rattlesnake, Cougar, Polar Bear, Black Bear, Massasauga Rattlesnake, Wolf, Coyote, and the Orca head the list. Though all animals pose some risk. Not all these creatures can be found in every location. I think, by and large, we do while in this country compared to others.

I would be interested in hearing from others.


3196 Beautiful Creatures, every one of them.

Picture from World Atlas
 
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Roybrew

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More fun if you don't dispel all those myths. Think about all the campfire stories that get wiped out if people know there isn't much to fear, well except for fear itself.

Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk
 

Northern Dancer

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You are right about that. When we have a greenhorn [not sure what the term means] we often fill his head with information that is well...not quite right. They did that to me years ago when they explained - rather carefully I thought, to check my sleeping bag for mice and rats before I got into it. The night came, into the sleeping bag I gently slide to have my feet feel a furry something or other with a tail. I shredded the sleeping bag to get out as fast as I could to the roar of laughter. They had placed a cattail at the bottom of my sleeping bag. My imagination took over from there.
 

Thomas H

Bibsoutdoors
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You are right about that. When we have a greenhorn [not sure what the term means] we often fill his head with information that is well...not quite right. They did that to me years ago when they explained - rather carefully I thought, to check my sleeping bag for mice and rats before I got into it. The night came, into the sleeping bag I gently slide to have my feet feel a furry something or other with a tail. I shredded the sleeping bag to get out as fast as I could to the roar of laughter. They had placed a cattail at the bottom of my sleeping bag. My imagination took over from there.
Now that brought a smile to my face! Lol!
 

ppine

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I have run into all of them on the list except polar bears.
Moose and polar bears are really dangerous.
 

ppine

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We met a guy once in Yellowstone traveling solo on a bike. He was from back East. This was a long time ago. We were drinking and he kept asking about problems with bears. We answered his questions with a few embellishments. The next thing you know he was building a sleeping platform in the nearest tree.
 

Northern Dancer

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We met a guy once in Yellowstone traveling solo on a bike. He was from back East. This was a long time ago. We were drinking and he kept asking about problems with bears. We answered his questions with a few embellishments. The next thing you know he was building a sleeping platform in the nearest tree.
=====> That's funny! You didn't tell him that bears are good climbers?
 
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