What Y'all Think About Floorless Tents?

Roybrew

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I was thinking about what PPine said about camping during the shoulder months. It's usually more quiet, less crowded and lot less bugs and snakes and such. But it is colder with unpredictable weather. I attract rain for some reason. I was thinking about a leaky tent, not that I've never had that problem, and maybe a small wood stove. With a floorless tent you don't have to worry about getting a hole in the floor. Throw down a tarp for a floor if need to, or small mat. Lot less weight. Just curious what your alls thoughts are.
Roy

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Happy Joe

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Tried a floorless, canvas, wall tent; it worked just fine, not sure how satisfied I would have been with leaks making the floor inside muddy though...

I currently vehicle (Jeep) camp so the weight of the tent w/floor and silver tarp/ground cloth is no biggie.

Enjoy
 

Roybrew

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Interesting tho. Thanks Joe.

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ppine

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Backpacking tents seem to always have a floor. In the last 10 years I mostly have used a tarp. I put down a tent foot print to sleep on.
I have been using canvas tents with no floor for over 40 years. If you have a stove, the inside will dry out quickly. In the western mountains, bug are not that much of a problem. Sometimes I bring a small rug to put next to the cot where I can stand up and get dressed. My dog sleeps on it.

I remember an elk hunting trip in the Jarbidge Mountains of Nevada at almost 9,000 feet. I brought the wall tent with the stove. We were in Englemann spruce and sagebrush. In the fall it can be cold at night in Nevada in single digits. We had a thunder storm with rain, snow and hail that lasted 12 hours with wind around 50 mph plus. The tent did fine. After about 8 hours of rain and snow, some small rivulets came right through the tent. We were in cots and had some furniture. Nothing really got wet. The storm ended and we dried everything in the outfit with a fire in the stove.

It was actually a great trip. We saw a wolf at close range, antelope, deer and elk running in all directions. Without the tent it would have been much different.
 

Northern Dancer

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Backpacking tents seem to always have a floor. In the last 10 years I mostly have used a tarp. I put down a tent foot print to sleep on.
I have been using canvas tents with no floor for over 40 years. If you have a stove, the inside will dry out quickly. In the western mountains, bug are not that much of a problem. Sometimes I bring a small rug to put next to the cot where I can stand up and get dressed. My dog sleeps on it.

I remember an elk hunting trip in the Jarbidge Mountains of Nevada at almost 9,000 feet. I brought the wall tent with the stove. We were in Englemann spruce and sagebrush. In the fall it can be cold at night in Nevada in single digits. We had a thunder storm with rain, snow and hail that lasted 12 hours with wind around 50 mph plus. The tent did fine. After about 8 hours of rain and snow, some small rivulets came right through the tent. We were in cots and had some furniture. Nothing really got wet. The storm ended and we dried everything in the outfit with a fire in the stove.

It was actually a great trip. We saw a wolf at close range, antelope, deer and elk running in all directions. Without the tent it would have been much different.
Luvs this account. I use "rugs" on the floor too, even if it has a floor. I use them to protect the fabric. I have a few different ones including a cowhide for use at basecamp. And the dog? Well, he has his own bed though he will jump up onto my cot - which is okay for a brief time until I find that I can't move because of him.
 

Roybrew

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Wow I like stories like what PPine just recounted. I wonder what you all were talking about while waiting out the storm. Playing cards, scrabble and or just good conversations. I've hiked in the Smokey Mtns at 5 to 6,000 ft, but that's the highest altitude, I think, I have ever been. I bet the night sky is really nice at 9 thousand feet.

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ppine

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Nevada is a secret. Don't tell anyone.
On this trip I had a cow elk tag for muzzleloader. I had close encounters with several bulls. One was in a big stand of willows. The rut had started and he had no fear of me. I was within 25 feet of him thrashing around in the deep brush. I felt like I was carrying a rifle for protection.

We saw a wolf plain as day in broad daylight from about 60 yards. They follow the elk herds down from southern Idaho. Now we even have a moose population.

One night I found a big area with aspens. It was downhill to the truck. No other people around. I found a good place for a stand. I had shooting lanes in several directions and branches on a tree for a rest. I waited as the sun went down. Right around dusk a 6 point bull stepped out of the woods and turned broadside to me. I used a rangefinder and he was 90 yards away. He had a very dark cape. I looked at him for 15 minutes. Alas I only had a cow tag. Tales from the Nevada Outback.
 

Northern Dancer

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Nevada is a secret. Don't tell anyone.
On this trip I had a cow elk tag for muzzleloader. I had close encounters with several bulls. One was in a big stand of willows. The rut had started and he had no fear of me. I was within 25 feet of him thrashing around in the deep brush. I felt like I was carrying a rifle for protection.

We saw a wolf plain as day in broad daylight from about 60 yards. They follow the elk herds down from southern Idaho. Now we even have a moose population.

One night I found a big area with aspens. It was downhill to the truck. No other people around. I found a good place for a stand. I had shooting lanes in several directions and branches on a tree for a rest. I waited as the sun went down. Right around dusk a 6 point bull stepped out of the woods and turned broadside to me. I used a rangefinder and he was 90 yards away. He had a very dark cape. I looked at him for 15 minutes. Alas I only had a cow tag. Tales from the Nevada Outback.
-----> I dunno, but I said it before - "There's some mighty fine reading here." Tales from the Nevada Outback? Now if that isn't a title of a good book, I don't know what is.
 

ppine

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Cool. My fan club is up to two.
I do like to tell stories. A life outdoors generates some experiences.

In two weeks I am doing a one hour lecture on "Forestry and Fire."
 
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