Joseph's Tips

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Pathfinder1

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Hi...


Today's tip de'jour...


CORDAGE: Cordage is nothing more than heavy cord. Examples of the two best and commoner types are ordinary jute cord and mil-spec paracord.

In an emergency, cordage can be improvised from tree saplings, vines, bark and inner bark, etc.

Cordage is a necessity, used for tying together the framework of your shelter, making snares, making snowshoes (hard work... I tried it!), tying food supplies out of the reach of bears and other critters, making fire starters, making a tripod, etc.
 

ponderosa

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For a change from the normal meat and potato tinfoil dinners, try instant rice. A tight foil pouch with white or brown instant rice and a few ice cubes to provide the moisture as it cooks will make fluffy rice. A good combination is rice, julienned carrot, red and green peppers, cut up chicken, and sweet & sour sauce. Another good one is rice, chicken, broccoli, yellow zucchini, and alfredo sauce. Spray the foil with pam first so the cooked rice doesn't stick to the foil.
 

Pathfinder1

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Hi...


Bonus not-necessarily-outdoors tip:

CAUTION: if any of your credit or debit cards contain this symbol ((( [each of the '('s decreasing in size]...that card contains a chip that can be read while it is still in your pocket, pocketbook, wallet or luggage...!!

This means that the card reader can collect ALL info on the card...account number info, etc., and use the card info as if it were their own card, and you would never know it until it was too late.

It is then recommended that you quickly exchange those cards for cards that do not contain that chip.
 

Hikenhunter

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Tip #17 10/19/12---- It occured to me this morning that most of the basic outdoor knowledge that I posess was learned as a boy scout and/or as a boy scout leader so I picked up the last edition of the boy scout handbook that I have in my possession and reviewed the requirements a boy needs to complete for his rank advancement from tenderfoot scout, to second class scout, to first class scout. As a result of this my tip for today is for any one heading outdoors to get yourself a copy of the most recent edition of the Boy Scout handbook and complete the requirements for the first three ranks. In doing so you can teach yourself the basics of: Safety and First Aid, Map and Compass Reading,Knots and Lashings, Proper Care and Use of Common Woods Tools, Basic Camp Cooking,and more including the proper way to conduct yourself in most any outdoor situation. Before this tip becomes a debate on peoples opinions of The Boy Scouts of America I want anyone reading this to know that you do not have to agree with the POLITICS or the POLICIES of the BSA, nor is it my intention to spark such a conversation here. My intention is simply to give you all a resource that I believe can help you gain a basic understanding of outdoor living from which you can then build more skills and knowledge as you gain experience in your outdoor activities.
 

Grandpa

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Oct 19 Kids love learning little skills as well. We wash and save tuna fish cans. When camping, bring out the cans, let the kids put a slice of pineapple (or other pie filling fruit) in the bottom, mix up a jiffy cake mix and fill the can 2/3 full, wrap in foil and put on the coals for 15 minutes. Simple way for them to make a delicous little desert all their very own.
 

Pathfinder1

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Hi...


10-19-12


Tip #007

Regarding the jute cordage mentioned above: Fire starters can also be made from six inch pieces of jute twine which have been partially unwound, dipped in hot wax, dried, and carried in most containers of suitable size. When the wax-impregnated jute pieces have dried, fold them in half and push them bottom-first into their container. To use, partially or fully separate their strands for use.

CAUTION: Never melt wax in a single container over an open flame. Hot wax is EXTREMELY flammable. Always use a double boiler.
 

oldsarge

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Aiming-off is aiming at a Line Feature deliberately to one side of the Target.

Reaching the Target directly could be difficult in poor visibility, and if it is missed, the walker would not know which direction to go in order to find it.

Aiming-Off is deliberately heading to reach a Line Feature some distance to the left (or right) of the Target.

When the Line Feature is reached the walker will know which direction to go along the Line Feature (i.e. Handrail the Line Feature) to reach the Target.

Examples of Aiming-Off might be:
Aiming for a Stream (Line Feature) to the west (left) of the Bothy (The Target).

Once the stream is reached the walker will know to head East (right) beside it (or Handrail the stream) to reach the Bothy (see above) or

Aiming for a Field Boundary Wall (Line Feature) to the South of a Trig Point (The Target).

As soon as the Field Boundary is reached the walker will know to head North beside it (or Handrail the Field Boundary Wall) to reach the Trig Point.

 

oldsarge

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Taking a bearing on the fall-line of a slope is a useful method of identifying which side of a hill you are on.

1. Stand facing downhill – the way a ball would roll if set away down the hill.

2. Point your compass in the direction of the fall-line – i.e. with direction of travel indicator pointing downhill.

3. Rotate the compass housing so that the arrow lines up with the pointer of the compass needle.

4. For accuracy include declination.

By studying the map and knowing roughly where you are, a slope with the same approximate direction can usually be quickly identified.

For additional accuracy, place the compass on the map so that the lines on the compass housing are parallel with the blue grid lines on the map.Orientate or Set the Map by rotating it until the red end of the needle and the red pointer on the compass coincide.

The compass should now be pointing down your slope and the long edge of the compass will indicate which slope you are on. It won't, however tell you whereabouts on the slope you are - for that you will need to take a couple of Back Bearings.
 

oldsarge

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If you're without compass, a simple stick and the sun can keep you on track. Push a stick in the ground so that it's upright and casts a shadow. Mark the tip of the shadow with a rock or another stick. Let 15 minutes pass--the shadow will have moved slightly. Mark the tip of this second shadow line. Now, draw a line between the two shadow tips to create an approximate east-west line. Stand with the first shadow-tip mark (west) on your left: North lies in front of you and south lies behind you.
 

Pathfinder1

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Hi...


Much further outdoor, survival, etc. info can be gotten from the Special Forces Handbook, the Map Reading and Navigation handbook and the Survival, Evasion and Recovery handbook.

All of these Military handbooks are now available from The Sportsman's Guide for $14.99 for the three of them.
 

charley

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For rainy muddy days in camp or for crick crossing try liner sox and neoprene sox with crocs or good sandals. They are lite and keep the feet warm and dry until you wade in water over the tops.
 

Hikenhunter

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Tip #18 10/20/12---- When camping in the snow fill your water bottles only about 3/4 full. Turn them upside down and bury them in the snow. Since snow is a natural insulator the water shouldn't freeze as long as you bury them deep enough. Should the water begin to freeze by turning the bottles upside down the water nearest the top of the bottle will not freeze and will therefore not block the bottle opening.
 

Pathfinder1

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Hi...

10-20-12

Tip #316 (part 1 of 3)


You're lost, stuck in a ravine miles from the nearest road. Hoping for a quick rescue, you turn on your cell phone. Dang. No signal. Discouraged, you turn it off.

Wait. Did you just make a big mistake?

Even if your cell phone has no service, attempting to dial 911 or leaving the phone turned on COULD transmit an electronic lifeline that lets rescuers know you're alive.

Here's how it works.

In the ideal scenario, calling 911 on a cell phone connects you to the nearest PSAP (public service answering point). Before the 911 operator can ask "What's your emergency?" a computer has already triangulated your latitude and longitude coordinates to within a few hundred feet using telemetry, your phone's GPS chip, or both. It even assigns your location a degree of error (ever watch NCIS?). If you're lost, the 911 operator transmits that location to local police and SAR teams so they know where to find you.

But what happens when your 911 call doesn't go through?

(continued tomorrow)
 

charley

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Get some resealable snack size baggies (6 1/2 x 3 1/4) many uses besides snacks. One of my uses is for a small bag that I carry in my pocket when in the woods. In this bag I have a cpl. cotton balls smeared with vasaline (firestarter) in it's own little snack bag, a very small knife, compass, firesteel and striker, cpl. water purifacation tablets, A quart size bag and mini flashlight . If you loose your pack, you will always have light, a way to make fire, a way to carry and purify water, and a compass to find your way home.
 

Pathfinder1

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Liberty, N.Y. Lower Catskill Mountains.
Get some resealable snack size baggies (6 1/2 x 3 1/4) many uses besides snacks. One of my uses is for a small bag that I carry in my pocket when in the woods. In this bag I have a cpl. cotton balls smeared with vasaline (firestarter) in it's own little snack bag, a very small knife, compass, firesteel and striker, cpl. water purifacation tablets, A quart size bag and mini flashlight . If you loose your pack, you will always have light, a way to make fire, a way to carry and purify water, and a compass to find your way home.



Hi...


Good idea.
Regarding the vaseline...this is a petroleum product, which can degrade some 'plastics', so please use caution.
 

ponderosa

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Two fantastic pieces of gear for car camping with little ones:

Go-Pod – P7002 Pistachio and

http://www.kidco.com/products-page/peapod/

I've used the Peapod a ton with my kids, as a great portable screened-in, shaded place for naps everywhere from the river bank to the beach.

I didn't have the Gopod with my babies, but if baby number three ever becomes a reality, I'm getting one! It would be fabulous to have in camp while parents are trying to cook, set up, eat, etc.
 
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Grandpa

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Oct 20 After a good lesson on Leave No Trace to my cub scouts, they each get a plastic litter bag and a small biner for our next hike. Cub that brings back the most litter gets to ride shotgun on the way home. Guaranteed no trash on that trail when we are done.:tinysmile_fatgrin_t Bonus, I don't have to carry my own trash out, plenty of volunteers to do it for me.:tinysmile_twink_t2:
 

Judy Ann

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When coastal camping you might want to take a few foot-long screw-in-the-ground stakes to secure your tent for sudden microbursts or tropical storm winds. They will also double as stakes to drop your dog's retractable leash handle over while car camping anywhere. My 68 pound springbar type canvas tent has held up during tropical storms using this method 100% of the time.
 

Grandpa

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When coastal camping you might want to take a few foot-long screw-in-the-ground stakes to secure your tent for sudden microbursts or tropical storm winds. They will also double as stakes to drop your dog's retractable leash handle over while car camping anywhere. My 68 pound springbar type canvas tent has held up during tropical storms using this method 100% of the time.
My tip for tomorrow is the redneck version to your long stakes, :tinysmile_twink_t2: But yours is a great tip for car camping.
 
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