When you go hiking or backpacking, will you take a water filter?

Jackie Cooper

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When you go hiking or backpacking, will you take a water filter? If you do, what kind of filter you will take? Otherwise, when you choose a filter,what kind of filters you will interested in? Good looking or the functions?
 

Grandpa

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Backpacking, a katydyne hiker pro. For hunting or day hiking, a Seychelle squeeze bottle, both good to six logs.
 

Grandpa

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At the time I bought my Katy, the only viable options were Katy and MSR. Both excellent but Katy had a higher volume rate. Katydyne has replaced broken parts twice, free, including shipping.
Seychelle used to make a squeeze model called Bottoms Up. The cap was permanently attached and you filled from the bottom. The idea being when you squeeze the seal around the lid/filter is compromised allowing dirty water to get into the clean. Seychelle solved this problem with a corrigation ring near the top to protect the seal, thereby making it possible to change filters.

There are many good options now but mine are paid for.
 

Grandpa

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If you are looking to buy a pump filter, I would suggest looking at the katydyne VARIO or MSR's SWEETWATER. I hike with friends that have both and the Katy, in my opinion, wins again. Sawyer now makes a good squeeze bottle. The key is to get something that filters to six logs. That will cover any water born pathogens present in the US.
 

Bojib

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I take a Sawyer Mini Water Filter with me. I like that it is somewhat multi purpose.

I can use it like a straw and drink straight from the source if need be, though I haven't.

It comes with a small bag I can fill up, then squeeze the water through the filter. This has worked well for me.

It looks as thought it may even be able to thread onto a 20 ounce soda/water bottle and I could squeeze and drink directly through the filter that way in case the bag fails, but I don't carry those types of bottles.

It's a simple design as well, no pump pieces to fail. It also comes with a syringe to backwash the filter to help extend the life of it as well. You just have to trust the water source you're using to backwash with.

I don't do any extended trips though. Mostly day hiking and camping trips that last only a couple of nights at most. If I were to do something of an extended period of time, I may would switch to something capable of filtering more water at a time.
 

Jackie Cooper

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Actually, I always take a diercon personal water filter, it claims it could filter out 99.9999% bacteria, and water tested good and great! Durable and portable!
 

Grandpa

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Actually, I always take a diercon personal water filter, it claims it could filter out 99.9999% bacteria, and water tested good and great! Durable and portable!
I've been checking that one out on Amazon Jackie. It looks like a good unit. I really like the price of replacement filters compared to my Katy hiker pro.
 

bibsoutdoors

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I just picked up the MSR Guardian. I can say no more than that, I've yet to use it. The claims the company makes I find very intriguing, I'll know more soon.

Bibsoutdoors
 

gillygilligan

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Always! Katyden I believe was brand I got - beats lugging 8.4 pounds per gallon to your site. Just check your maps for a water source and bring a hydration bladder - hopefully fully integrated into your pack.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
 

ppine

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I have a Katydyne hiker and take it for overnights and day trips. Sometimes I just carry halozone tablets. I used a simple filter for 40 years before that.
It was common to drink out of streams prior to about 1975. Now we are more careful, but every once in awhile I cannot resist drinking directly out of a clean spring in the mountains.
 

Terasec

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i use a katadyn hiker pro for all my outings
its about the size of a soda can. fits easily in day packs
I rather carry the filter than extra water, or wait to boil and cool when out.
have used it for 10 years and not a problem
my land has a lot of stagnant swamp water, hiker pro filters it just fine
 

Cappy

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our camper has a really good filter built into the water tank supply line. When hooked to a camp ground hose it by passed but the water tank is filtered. We like it that way so we use it when needed and by pass it when not this much extends the filters life.
 

gillygilligan

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i use a katadyn hiker pro for all my outings
its about the size of a soda can. fits easily in day packs
I rather carry the filter than extra water, or wait to boil and cool when out.
have used it for 10 years and not a problem
my land has a lot of stagnant swamp water, hiker pro filters it just fine
I also use a katadyn and for the size and versalitity I feel it can't be beat - quick couple for camel bak style bladders and ease of cleaning bode well for me.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
 

Arla

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If you going with a big group, divided amounts of water or a group water bladder should work (as long as everyone has an equal load:Boink:if you know what I mean.) But, I like the idea of Iodine.
 

Grandpa

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When talking water cleansing, no one system does it all. You need to know the threats where you are going to be hiking. Iodine, aqua mira, halazone and other chemicals kill all water borne pathogens as does boiling. But these do not remove heavy metals or harmful chemicals. There are many places where naturally occuring arsenic is present as well as even more places where mining or manufacturing has contaminated the water.

A good filter, one that filters to six logs (99.9999 % or > 0.2 micron) will remove heavy metals, all bacteria, and even some virus's. Some filters even have an activated carbon section to aid in killing virus's as well.

All this being said, most mountain waters are safe to drink raw. Tests have shown that running streams and even high traffic lakes are relatively clean. However, it only takes once getting ghiardia or cryptosporidiosis to make a believer out of you of the necessity for treating water. Rather than getting dehydrated, drink and take your chances of getting sick. Dehydration can kill you in a few hours but the incubation rate for waterborn pathogens is at least 72-96 hours.
 
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