The New Camping Mistakes We Make

Northern Dancer

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The most common mistake I see is people getting balled up in planning and making lists. Sometimes they get paralyzed. Learn to just grab some stuff and go. Over the years I have forgotten all kinds of things. It is how we learn to work around missing items.
The most common mistake I see is people getting balled up in planning and making lists. Sometimes they get paralyzed. Learn to just grab some stuff and go. Over the years I have forgotten all kinds of things. It is how we learn to work around missing items.
=====> Agree.
But I had to start somewhere.
I now have four sections in the basement. Canoeing - with the equipment I would need. Basecamp - what would be appropriate for a stationary location, and Crash - the very essential things that I could get away with. Lastly - miscellaneous - things that would be specific for any trip. Items might include, a water purification kit, a particular sleeping bag, or a gadget that might be needed.

Though I have a list that is posted for each section so I know immediately what is in my inventory I usually make a menu including items that require specific spices etc. Though I noted that Xander Budnick does it all by memory.
 

Northern Dancer

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BUYING THE WRONG TENT?
I have purchased a hundred tents or more.
Sometimes I simply purchased a tent because I didn't like the one I had.
As a serious camper/canoer, my solution is to have more than one tent.
Indeed - my 2023 inventory lists four tents though at one time I had eleven. [Dumb]
I have four different tents to meet four specific camping/canoeing needs because no one tent does that for me.


WHAT'S THE RIGHT TENT FOR YOU?
I'm not sucked into thinking the name brands have the edge.

You look up the "best" tents and you are guaranteed they have the same standard brand names.
NO that's not always the way to go.
Do the research and take your time. Make comparisons, look for sales, and check them out
at the retailers, feel the material, read the labels, and ask people in the know and check out the chat lines.
Never buy on impulse.


IF YOU ARE A SERIOUS CAMPER ASK THESE QUESTIONS
What am I going to use this tent for?
Canoe camping? Basecamp? Scout Camp? Hunting Camp? Weekenders? Getaway?
How often will I use it and under what circumstances?
Numerous times? Occasionally? Until my Mother-in-law leaves?
What season? One, Two, Three, Winter?
Will I need to share it with someone else?
Family? Backpacking? Dog? Gorilla?
What can I carry in terms of tent weight?
Do you have to carry it in? How far?
What's my budget limit?
Cheap? Not so cheap? I'm ready to buy.


OTHER IMPORTANT THINGS TO KEEP IN MIND
When I see the term: "one-man tent" or a similar suggestion? I immediately up it one.
One becomes two and two becomes three etc.
Do I want to crawl into a tent every night for the next ten days?
Or do I want to walk in?
Are there tent poles in the centre of the tent or at the side?


WEEKEND WARRIOR
If you don't camp often or you are just trying it out for the first time you may
want to consider renting.
If you care less, buy anything you want and wish for the best.



3919


This is my A-frame
Big enough for me and I would be okay with one other.
I can stand tall.
Front and back entrance.
Screen doors front and back.
No centre pole.
Can be erected by one person.
Light enough for canoe tripping.
Excellent ventilation and rooftop to keep out the water.
Notice - it only has two guy lines.




 
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ppine

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There is so much equipment out there it is easy to buy the wrong things. So many reviews and half of it is lies.
I don't make too many new mistakes because I have been camping for work, for fun and as a way of life since the 1950s.
If you have some equipment that is not functioning the way you want to, try using it differently. If that doesn't work, try something else.
 

Northern Dancer

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There is so much equipment out there it is easy to buy the wrong things. So many reviews and half of it is lies.
I don't make too many new mistakes because I have been camping for work, for fun and as a way of life since the 1950s.
If you have some equipment that is not functioning the way you want to, try using it differently. If that doesn't work, try something else.
=====> It took me a long time to learn. And you are right, there is a lot of equipment that is useless and not necessary. But the lure of it all is intoxicating. I do the same as you - I give away what I don't like and recycle the items I can.
 

Roybrew

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I'm sitting in this cool rocking chair thinking, "yeh baby I need another camp chair". IMG_20230218_130054586_HDR.jpgLike I need another hole in my head. It is very comfy.

The Great Outdoors
 

Northern Dancer

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A good chair. A good sleep system. Real food. A table. Something to drink.
Good dogs. Good friends.
When it is cold. A good fire.
If you have these things you are rich.
----->It's almost poetic, the way you put it, Pine. I'll add a good book, a camera...and a partridge in a pear tree. Well, maybe not the partridge in a pear tree. What you are saying is very true - add the lure of the outdoor life and I have to admit it's a real good feeling.
 

ppine

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Footwear is important, especially on the water. I like the new boat shoes. They protect your feet and the water drains out of them. I bought some for a Grand Canyon trip and hiking the side canyons. Now I wear them when ever around the water.

I did one canoe trip in the Boundary Waters of Minn. I wanted to be traditional and wore moose hide moccasins on the portages. Early in the trip I kicked a tree root and broke my big toe. That was a problem for the whole next week.
 

Northern Dancer

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Footwear is important, especially on the water. I like the new boat shoes. They protect your feet and the water drains out of them. I bought some for a Grand Canyon trip and hiking the side canyons. Now I wear them when ever around the water.

I did one canoe trip in the Boundary Waters of Minn. I wanted to be traditional and wore moose hide moccasins on the portages. Early in the trip I kicked a tree root and broke my big toe. That was a problem for the whole next week.
-----> That's funny! [Physical humour - right?] It takes time, but we learn. A bought a blow-up bed once. That was the end of that. I had a fancy mattress too. I had this terrifying nightmare I was a wiener in a bun. I woke up in a sweat to discover I was in the middle of this expensive air mattress that was slowly leaking. Oh yeah, we took this portable toilet seat along to keep us comfortable and off the ground while doing business. We hear this horrendous scream coming from one of our colleagues in the middle of the night. The chair sank into the ground to one side and our sitting buddy fall over to the other side. Is anyone up to a midnight swim?
 

Roybrew

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I ain't never broke my big toe. That's got to suck! I have turned over my toilet seat before, I got lucky is all I'm going to say about that.

I bought a pair of these NRS bootsScreenshot_20230224-000946-657.jpgthey are warm and comfortable. I got them used and a size larger. When it's cold I wear a pair of thick wool socks inside of them. Ever if my socks get wet they are still warm and comfortable.IMG_20221020_162226603_HDR.jpg

The Great Outdoors
 

Northern Dancer

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I ain't never broke my big toe. That's got to suck! I have turned over my toilet seat before, I got lucky is all I'm going to say about that.

I bought a pair of these NRS bootsView attachment 3931they are warm and comfortable. I got them used and a size larger. When it's cold I wear a pair of thick wool socks inside of them. Ever if my socks get wet they are still warm and comfortable.View attachment 3932

The Great Outdoors
-----> You are certainly my kind of camper - positive, humorous, risk-taking, and practicable. You can cook, right? [Great picture].
 

Roybrew

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I hate cooking. I remember reading about what Rob Kesselring said about cooking and eating while afield, "In the end it all just makes a turd". Simpler to just pour some hot water into some dehydrated stuff.
Just my opinion.

The Great Outdoors
 

ppine

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Yuck. Food is one of the great pleasure in the outdoors.
Muck boots that are knee high are just the thing for the marshes and swamps of the North Woods. For most place they are too much boot. Good for early and late season trips.
 

Northern Dancer

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GOING BEYOND THE BIG-NAME BRANDS
A common mistake made by many is the assumption that the big-brand names have the best.
Not necessarily.

People who are experienced outdoor people are well aware of the fact
that a manufacturer will spend more money on advertising
that on improving the product line.
"All we got to do is to convince people that our product is "best".
Their best isn't always the best.

Marketing is a skill that is taught and there is a reason why it's a skill.
Like already, it's to get you
* positioned to buy - even if it isn't your intention.
Commercials are the same.
You don't spend half a million bucks because it doesn't work.


SO WHAT DO YOU DO TO MANAGE THE "BESTS"?
First of all, you don't buy on impulse.
You scheme - that is to say you have a systematic plan.
You do your research long before you purchase.
Check out the competition.
Definitely buy on sale.
For goodness sake check prices - a lot of people don't.
Look at products made by other firms and companies.
Check out other sources that are selling the same product.
Read, read, read the printed material very carefully, and check out independent consumer reports.
Make sure you can send/take the item back and get your money back if you are not satisfied.
Read carefully what the company's policy is about returns - if you don't understand what they are
talking about it's a red flag. Unless you want to gamble on being happy don't buy.
Check out the "guarantee" policy and what you need to do if you have to make a claim.


AND ANOTHER THING

Be reasonable in your expectations.
I'm amazed at the lack of common sense when it comes to purchasing products.


DOES ANYONE WANT TO SHARE A HORROR STORY?




* I do not promote (a product, service, or business) within a particular sector of a market.
 
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Northern Dancer

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POPUP TENTS
One of the newer products on the market for tent campers is the popup tent.

From my observation, there are various models and price tags.
So what do the professionals say about them?

From "Adventure"
The bottom line? A popup tent isn’t technical enough for mountain expeditions,
and you wouldn’t want to take it on committing multiday treks either.
It isn’t lightweight enough for wild camping, or portable enough for backpacking,
and it’s only really suitable for warm summer weekends.
On the other hand, another person said about Popup Tents -
A popup tent is a fast setup tent that 'pops' itself into shape.
You simply have to open the tent bag, remove the tent and throw it into the air.
The tent then grows into a full tent shape.
Another report suggested that most popup tents designed for camping are water-resistant.
From reading several articles there seem to be pros and cons.
So what to do?
Read as many articles as you can before making a decision to purchase.
Frankly, I've never seen any popups on canoe trips and very few in campgrounds.
They remind me of those kiddies' bounce houses.
Do the research.




 

Northern Dancer

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BUYING THE RIGHT CAMP CHAIR
At one time the only real choice was to make your own with the material that you had on hand.
But today there is a multiplicity of choices based on what your need or want.

YOU CAN MAKE YOUR OWN.
You can be fancy or simple - whatever it is you want.


4034 40354036 4037

THESE ARE THE KINDS OF CHAIRS I USE

4038 4039 4040 4041

The "New Mistake" people make in buying a camp chair is to go cheap and use it for the wrong purpose.
Some of those cheap simple fold chairs are really hard on the back.



 
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ppine

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I make few new mistakes because I have been camping since the 1950s.
I have one good chair and use it for everything from truck camping to river trips. Got it from REI and it is insulated with wood arms.
 

Northern Dancer

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I make few new mistakes because I have been camping since the 1950s.
I have one good chair and use it for everything from truck camping to river trips. Got it from REI and it is insulated with wood arms.
----->I thought that funny. "I make few new mistakes because I have been camping since the 1950s." I think I can say the same in that I make a lot fewer mistakes than in the past. And what's funnier is I'm quick to judge others and their dumbness - and then I think to myself. Ya...I did that too, a long time ago. :Frown2:

Good to see you online "Captain".
 
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