SLAPJACKS----->

Northern Dancer

Moderator
Messages
1,057
Points
113
Galette, waffle, griddle cake, flannel cake, flapjack, slapjack, and so on. The pancake is an institution that is widely represented and deserves mention on this cold snowy halfway through the winter night. PANCAKE! I'm thinking it would be great to rustle up some good ol' fashion panners and swat a mosquito or two.

Other than the recipe for at home or base camp I've leaned on the "just add water" kind when I'm tripping. I'm just amazed at how many different kinds there are and how easy one can make up their own formula.

What can you add to the following?

3287 3288 3289 3290 3291

3292 3293 3294 3295 3296

THIS IS NOT A CONTEST AND THERE IS NO PRIZE because I'm cheap.
 

ppine

Forester
Messages
3,949
Points
113
Location
Minden, NV
In the West, Krusteaz made in Seattle and developed in a ladies garage are the hands down favorite. Just add water.
They also make biscuit, cake and other mixtures.
Also known as Crusty Ass.
 

Northern Dancer

Moderator
Messages
1,057
Points
113
In the West, Krusteaz made in Seattle and developed in a ladies garage are the hands down favorite. Just add water.
They also make biscuit, cake and other mixtures.
Also known as Crusty Ass.
3297 3298 3299 THANK YOU! I'm going to be looking for that one.
 

ppine

Forester
Messages
3,949
Points
113
Location
Minden, NV
My Dad was not much of a cook, but he took us camping all the time. He would make pancakes and flip them in the air and catch them in the pan. We thought they were the greatest thing around.

I like making pancakes and mostly use Krusteaz. I like Snoqualmie Falls and Kodiak pancake mixes, but they cost about 2.5x more than Crusty Ass.
Nothing like a layover day on a river trip and having the big breakfast with bacon, pancakes and fruit in a beautiful spot by a river.
 

Northern Dancer

Moderator
Messages
1,057
Points
113
My Dad was not much of a cook, but he took us camping all the time. He would make pancakes and flip them in the air and catch them in the pan. We thought they were the greatest thing around.

I like making pancakes and mostly use Krusteaz. I like Snoqualmie Falls and Kodiak pancake mixes, but they cost about 2.5x more than Crusty Ass.
Nothing like a layover day on a river trip and having the big breakfast with bacon, pancakes and fruit in a beautiful spot by a river.
3306 3307

"Ya see...that's da ting about us guys with experience" - we know the good stuff. As recently as two weeks ago I was introduced to Kodiak. As you can see my friend - it comes in English and French languages.
 

Roybrew

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,288
Points
113
Location
East Tn
I fixed pancakes on a river trip with my nephew. We got camp setup, a good fire going and we were starving. You should've seen the surprise look on his face when I started making pancakes for dinner. It was one of those priceless moments. sitting by a warm fire, watching the river flow by eating pancakes. Don't get no better.

Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk
 

ppine

Forester
Messages
3,949
Points
113
Location
Minden, NV
Verlen Kruger and Clint Waddell talked a lot about pancakes on their paddle across Canada. They had some 50 mile, 75 mile and even 100 miles days going down big fast rivers. There is little darkness in Canada in the summer. When they felt fatigued or dragging ass, they would pull over and make pancakes served with real maple syrup made in Canada. Carbos and the maple sugar always perked them up and got them ready to travel.

No forester worth his salt or his Filsons, would ever eat pancakes without maple syrup that comes out of a tree.
 

Northern Dancer

Moderator
Messages
1,057
Points
113
3312 Runs at about $30.00 or 3313 $12.00 for this small container.

It's a tradition around here - you get one supply of maple syrup for the summer [at Christmas time].
 

ppine

Forester
Messages
3,949
Points
113
Location
Minden, NV
I used to have a close friend that graduated from the U of Michigan with a degree in forestry in 1938. Every fall he would invite me over to his house. We would eat some pancakes with real maple syrup. It was a ritual. Then we would fire up the forge and bang on some iron. Another ritual. It has a rhythm to it. Heat the metal, have a conversation. Figure out the next move with the metal. Pull the work out of the forge and work it. Reheat. Repeat. A wonderful way to spend time with a friend. Al taught cross country skiing in his 80s. I miss him all the time.

In the late 1930s Al went on a 3 week canoe trip in the what is now the Boundary Waters. His outfitter was Sigurd Olsen.
 

Northern Dancer

Moderator
Messages
1,057
Points
113
I used to have a close friend that graduated from the U of Michigan with a degree in forestry in 1938. Every fall he would invite me over to his house. We would eat some pancakes with real maple syrup. It was a ritual. Then we would fire up the forge and bang on some iron. Another ritual. It has a rhythm to it. Heat the metal, have a conversation. Figure out the next move with the metal. Pull the work out of the forge and work it. Reheat. Repeat. A wonderful way to spend time with a friend. Al taught cross country skiing in his 80s. I miss him all the time.

In the late 1930s Al went on a 3 week canoe trip in the what is now the Boundary Waters. His outfitter was Sigurd Olsen.
-----> The conversation took my breath away.
 

ppine

Forester
Messages
3,949
Points
113
Location
Minden, NV
Latest iteration for hot cakes. Krusteaz mix, but then use milk instead of water, and add eggs, as many as you like. Make the batter thin. Then you have Swedish style hot cakes. Great with real maple syrup or fruit or jam. Ligonberries are traditional in Sweden.
 

Northern Dancer

Moderator
Messages
1,057
Points
113
Latest iteration for hot cakes. Krusteaz mix, but then use milk instead of water, and add eggs, as many as you like. Make the batter thin. Then you have Swedish style hot cakes. Great with real maple syrup or fruit or jam. Ligonberries are traditional in Sweden.
-----> I like that, Pine. I tend to read the instructions on the package and then, if I have a hankering, I add my own ingredients. So, if I'm at base camp I can afford the luxury of throwing in the milk [sometimes 5% cream], eggs, and whatever. When I'm in the backcountry I tend to stay with the information provided. When I'm cheeky, I change the name of the product and claim it to be my own recipe because of what I've added. Like Saskatchewan Stew. The chief ingredient is "Sask" - I have no idea what that is. :Smile2:
 
Top