Boots vs Shoes

Super_Jenny

New Member
Messages
7
Points
3
Location
Perth
I can’t decide if I should invest in ankle support boots or the lighter more comfortable trail running shoe? Can anyone help?

I won’t be doing one kind of hike, I want to be able to have that variety and a shoe/boot that can manage anything.

Thanks


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Roybrew

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,025
Points
113
I think you would need 2 pair of shoes. One pair that isn't so ankle restrictive for running, and another pair that has good ankle support for when your carrying a pack.

We were hiking, more like climbing around, a place in North Carolina called Grand Father mtn. 20180629_115901.jpg lots of rock scaling20180629_112937.jpg and climbing wood ladders. Ankle support is a great thing for this kind of activity, but not to restrictive. My shoes had no ankle support. I took a wrong step, twisted my ankle and fell backward on my pack. I was ok except for my ankle started to swell. A little ankle support would've protected my ankle.
Roy

Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk
 

Super_Jenny

New Member
Messages
7
Points
3
Location
Perth
I think you would need 2 pair of shoes. One pair that isn't so ankle restrictive for running, and another pair that has good ankle support for when your carrying a pack.

We were hiking, more like climbing around, a place in North Carolina called Grand Father mtn. View attachment 3568 lots of rock scalingView attachment 3569 and climbing wood ladders. Ankle support is a great thing for this kind of activity, but not to restrictive. My shoes had no ankle support. I took a wrong step, twisted my ankle and fell backward on my pack. I was ok except for my ankle started to swell. A little ankle support would've protected my ankle.
Roy

Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk
Thanks Roy.

I’ve was told that people who hike a lot have stronger ankles over time so can get away without ankle support, not sure how true that is.

I’m not in any way someone who’s a runner, only walking. Thanks so much for your advice, your photos are amazing!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Northern Dancer

Moderator
Messages
723
Points
63
It's great to see you online Super Jenny.
I've always used "hiker boots" [the lighter ones] for support. I like the ones that come up to the ankle too because it helps guard against critters. There are numerous boots in the market place and selecting the best for one's self can be difficult. I made my decision based on what I intended to use them for. In my case it was for canoe camping.
 

Super_Jenny

New Member
Messages
7
Points
3
Location
Perth
It's great to see you online Super Jenny.
I've always used "hiker boots" [the lighter ones] for support. I like the ones that come up to the ankle too because it helps guard against critters. There are numerous boots in the market place and selecting the best for one's self can be difficult. I made my decision based on what I intended to use them for. In my case it was for canoe camping.
Good advice, thanks northern


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Denni2

Member
Messages
49
Points
8
My answer will not be popular here. I prefer to hike in my barefoot accepted ballet flats. I have had several pairs of “supportive“ hiking shoes and boots. I developed major hip pain and got to the point I was in constant pain when I went out. I found out I have 4 bulging discs in my lower spine. They won‘t try to fix them because they can’t tell exactly where the nerve is being pinched. Long story short. I starting living in my ballet flats and last summer we were camping in Shenandoah NP. I have always wanted to hike on the AT so I decided I would hike until the pain started, I can usually tell it’s starting. I walked 2 miles! I was wearing my minimalist flats. So I purchased a pair of Vivo Barefoot hiking boots. I can hike in them but I feel more sure footed in the ballet flats. I can feel every step. I can wrap my toes and grip. People roll their eyes but I slip less because aI can feel the ground with my whole foot. My next purchase will be hiking moccasins.
 

Northern Dancer

Moderator
Messages
723
Points
63
I think it is important to understand we purchase/use equipment of various kinds to meet our needs. The reality is if it works for you, it works for you. I purchased crocks [the right size] for my past canoe trip to protect my feet from protruding rocks and sticks as I portaged. The one shoe hurt my large toe and now I have one of those blisters that will take four to six months to heal. It was not a good buy - I'm returning to sandals that are a whole lot better for me.

Nice to see you online Denni2 - trust all is well in your camp. :Smile2:
 

Roybrew

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,025
Points
113
I've seen people hiking with sandals and a few with the shoes that have toes. I've never noticed the flat shoes before. I'm very flat footed, and struggle with the safety shoes I have to wear at work. I almost always have to attack the inside foot bed of my work shoes with a razor blade. So far the best hiking shoes, that work for me, are the Columbia brand. They hold up well and fit great, and I don't have to surgically remove parts of the formed insole. I couldn't imagine having a messed up back. That's got to suck big time.
Roy

Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk
 
Top