Joseph's Tips

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Hikenhunter

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Tip#19 10/21/12---- The threads on waterbottles and bottle lids are a breeding spot for lots of bacteria especially if you are drinking right out of the bottle. Also the drinking spout on pop top bottles and the mouth peice of hydration bladders. To avoid dysentary clean these areas frequently when backpacking for several days. Two of the easiest ways to clean them are to rinse them with boiling water or carry a supply of alcohol prep pads and wipe them down with the pads.
 

ponderosa

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Why am I always awake at midnight? Anyway, Sunday's tip:

A lot of people have problems with hydration bladders becoming stale and/or mildewy because they are so difficult to clean and thoroughly dry, especially the tubing. This isn't a problem if you just store it in the freezer. Wash the mouth piece, give the rest a quick rinse, and toss it in the freezer. We've stored them this way for at least ten years, and it works great. I only use water in mine, but my husband puts sports drinks in his all the time and it's never gotten yucky with this cleaning/storage routine.
 

Grandpa

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October 21 Good tents can keep you dry in a big rainstorm but even good tents give you no protection from a big wind if they aren't lashed down properly. Be sure to use all available guy lines any time and if you see those clouds start to roll indicating high wind coming there are several things you can do to help you keep that tent intact.

Start by placing your stakes at a 30 degree angle away from the tent to hold better. Driving stakes straight into the ground will not require much wind to pull them back out. When camping in sandy or loose soil conditions, you can use your dirty socks as deadmen. Fill the sock with the sand, attach the guy line and bury the sock deep in the loose sand or soil. This will hold much better than just a stake. You can also use heavy sticks or rocks, if available as deadmen. On firm ground, a heavy rock placed on the stake will help keep the stake in the ground. Guys can also be attached directly to heavy rocks or available shrub or tree growth. :tinysmile_sleep_t:

Double staking can also help keep those guy lines tight. Stake the tent normally, then put a second stake back about 6-12inches from the first and tie another cord from the original to the second stake.

The longer the guy line, the tighter the angle between the guy and the stake and the tighter the angle, the less chance of the stake pulling out.

A high wind can shred a $400 tent just as easily as a $30 dollar tent, so don't take chances on not getting a good nights sleep.
 
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Pathfinder1

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October 21 Good tents can keep you dry in a big rainstorm but even good tents give you no protection from a big wind if they aren't lashed down properly. Be sure to use all available guy lines any time and if you see those clouds start to roll indicating high wind coming there are several things you can do to help you keep that tent intact.

Start by placing your stakes at a 30 degree angle away from the tent to hold better. Driving stakes straight into the ground will not require much wind to pull them back out. When camping in sandy or loose soil conditions, you can use your dirty socks as deadmen. Fill the sock with the sand, attach the guy line and bury the sock deep in the loose sand or soil. This will hold much better than just a stake. You can also use heavy sticks or rocks, if available as deadmen. On firm ground, a heavy rock placed on the stake will help keep the stake in the ground. Guys can also be attached directly to heavy rocks or available shrub or tree growth. :tinysmile_sleep_t:

Double staking can also help keep those guy lines tight. Stake the tent normally, then put a second stake back about 6-12inches from the first and tie another cord from the original to the second stake.

The longer the guy line, the tighter the angle between the guy and the stake and the tighter the angle, the less chance of the stake pulling out.





A high wind can shred a $400 tent just as easily as a $30 dollar tent, so don't take chances on not getting a good nights sleep.

Hi...


It's your last sentence that says it all...!!
 

Pathfinder1

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10-21-12


Hi...


Dead cell phones CAN have a use when you need emergency help - (part 2 of 3)

But what happens when your 911 call doesn't go through?

Well, the wireless provider may still have recorded the actual time you activated your phone to make a call. Before a call is initiated, a cell phone and the nearest tower greet each other with a digital 'handshake'. Unlike voice calls or text messages, these electronic packets require very little energy to send or receive. Sometimes these handshakes transmit when your phone indicates no reception. Sometimes they bounce off towers that your phone doesn't have permission to use. And sometimes they get through when they shouldn't...like in remote and mountainous terrain. Different towers and nodes can share these handshakes, too. In almost all cases, the data trail is logged and saved on computers owned by wireless service providers. When someone goes missing, law enforcement officials can find out that person's cell phone number, call the service provider's special emergency hotline, and access the data trail for a specific phone.

But, what does this mean for lost persons?

It means that your phone can contact cell towers...sending and retrieving tiny electronic breadcrumbs...even if your ability to communicate is zilch. NOTE: this is why you should include your cell number with the itinerary details you leave with trusted family and friends.

(part 3 [conclusion] tomorrow)
 

ponderosa

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Good stuff Grandpa posted about guying out a tent. I've also used grocery sacks attached to the line as dead man anchores under the sand or snow.
 

Judy Ann

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Joseph, If you ever participate in something such as this thread in the future, the advice you give will have more value to others than the prize that you might win. Your dad was cool to come up with this idea to celebrate your safe arrival.
 

Judy Ann

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Am I the only one wondering why the rest of our forum members don't post on this thread? I read so many great tips and advice daily from everyone that I can't believe all of OBC isn't posting. Heck, I haven't a clue what the SOG gift is this time, but I have worn out my OBC shirts and need a new one!

One of the fire starters Jason sent in my package started a fire for me last week when I was too tired to baton a piece of firewood (which I finally managed to perfect with the SOG knife I won in a similar challenge here after reading about that fire starting skill here too). Half of oldsarge's compass advice is over my head, but one of these days I'll be able to depend on one of the two compasses that I always carry because I READ that I need a backup one somewhere. ;-)

I can't wait to read about OBC member's dream canoeing, fishing, biking, hiking, camping, RV, and four wheeling stories. The tales posted about children, grandchildren, foster children and other friends and family members have provided many a chuckle after a long day at work. I hope to meet more folks from this site in the future.

What if Joseph doesn't like backpacking or camping?
 

Hikenhunter

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Tip# 20 10/22/12---- It is true that smoke follows you around the campfire. It is attracted to the vacuum that is formed by a large object. I am not a scientist so I'm not sure how that vacuum happens but we all know that the smoke does follow you as you move around the fire. To get the smoke to stop following you all you have to do is build up a short wall of stones close to the fire pit. build it at least three feet high and 12 inches away from the edge of your fire ring.The smoke will rise in the direction of the wall leaving you free to sit on the side opposite the wall and cook or enjoy the ambiance of the fire.
 

Hikenhunter

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Am I the only one wondering why the rest of our forum members don't post on this thread? I read so many great tips and advice daily from everyone that I can't believe all of OBC isn't posting. Heck, I haven't a clue what the SOG gift is this time, but I have worn out my OBC shirts and need a new one!

One of the fire starters Jason sent in my package started a fire for me last week when I was too tired to baton a piece of firewood (which I finally managed to perfect with the SOG knife I won in a similar challenge here after reading about that fire starting skill here too). Half of oldsarge's compass advice is over my head, but one of these days I'll be able to depend on one of the two compasses that I always carry because I READ that I need a backup one somewhere. ;-)

I can't wait to read about OBC member's dream canoeing, fishing, biking, hiking, camping, RV, and four wheeling stories. The tales posted about children, grandchildren, foster children and other friends and family members have provided many a chuckle after a long day at work. I hope to meet more folks from this site in the future.

What if Joseph doesn't like backpacking or camping?
You are not the only one wondering why there aren't more posting on this thread. I was wondering the same. My shirts are fine but I lost my OBC cap in the river acouple months ago so I'm hoping to win another. I can't wait to read the newest tips each day, even after many years of playing in the outdoors it never ceases to amaze me just how much more there is to learn. You just gotta love it.
 

Judy Ann

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Tip# 20 10/22/12---- It is true that smoke follows you around the campfire. It is attracted to the vacuum that is formed by a large object. I am not a scientist so I'm not sure how that vacuum happens but we all know that the smoke does follow you as you move around the fire. To get the smoke to stop following you all you have to do is build up a short wall of stones close to the fire pit. build it at least three feet high and 12 inches away from the edge of your fire ring.The smoke will rise in the direction of the wall leaving you free to sit on the side opposite the wall and cook or enjoy the ambiance of the fire.
Interesting. We just split up and holler at each other after a while of moving away from the smoke and hope that the wind will keep blowing in one direction. ;-)
 

Grandpa

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It has been a great excercise remembering all the little things that just come natural when I am out there. Reading others tips are also reminders, with some great new ideas for me to use and remembering the times I have used others. I will definately be building my own little book at the end of the month.
 

Judy Ann

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If anyone (Jason) gathers these posts at the end of the month, please post the info so that we all can save these great tips. I am a little lazy and a great fan of not recreating the wheel whenever possible.

Thank you to whomever takes on this task!
 

Judy Ann

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One of my favorite tips for beginner backpackers was to purchase a Boy Scout Manual and work on the same skills as the young ones learn. Photocopy the skill-set of the day or days and enjoy the lessons. YouTube has videos if you like to see the demonstration as well as read directions. No boredom necessary in the evening!
 
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Grandpa

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Oct 22 To prevent potatoes from turning black when preparing ahead of time, (for camping, foil dinners, etc) adding "fruit fresh" will help a little, but some blacking will still occur. Living in Idaho and having available lots of potatoes, we partially pre-cook them, then freeze for later use.

We usually lay in about 200-300 lbs of potatoes in the fall. But potatoes, even in a root cellar, seem to have the same energy as an over hormonal teenager when spring comes. Those eyes start to sprout and within days, they can grow two feet of vines, roots or whatever those shoots want to be.

So, in the later winter, we get out the deep fryer and go to work on the surviving potatoes, (most of what we stored away is still there) We cube some, french fry cut some, slice some and shred some for hashbrowns. After peeling, a five minute dip in the deep fryer, drain, cool and bag in serving size units, and into the freezer they go to be used all summer. We also dehydrate some for backpacking meals.

This has multiple advantages. Most of the work is done in the cabin fever winter months when boredom reaches a peak and leaves the fast paced, busy summers free of peeling and preparing potatoes. Remember, the potatoes are only partially cooked so will still need to finish cooking along with that omlette, roast, meat loaf or whatever.
 

Pathfinder1

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Hi...


Dead cell phones CAN be of use when you need emergency help (part 3 of 3).

Keep in mind, however, not all SAR members know about those hidden messages that cell phones can leave. Many SAR teams are experts in lost person behavior. They know how people are drawn to linear terrain features like roads and rivers. They know how to interview friends of family to develop a search profile. And many rescuers are outfitted with high-tech navigation and safety gear. But when it comes to communication technology, SAR teams can find themselves as out-paced as the rest of us. The November 2006 death of James Kim in Oregon is one example of family members blaming rescue leaders for ignoring technology. The arrival of more powerful cell phones, and even SATELLITE-ENHANCED SMARTPHONES, suggest the complexity of this problem will only increase. In a perfect world, better technology means more lost persons are rescued. But we all know the imperfect ways that technology meshes with nature.

So what should you do?

If you own a cell phone (or SMART-er phone), bring it on every hike. Before you leave, give your phone number and service provider to your check-in contact. Plus, don't think that your cell phone or GPS is a substitute for a good map and accurate compass. Keep your phone turned off during the hike, but turn it on occasionally to check for service (and to drop some digital breadcrumbs). If you become dangerously lost or injured, dial 911 even if you don't have strong service. For better service, head for higher ground...cell phones operate by line-of-sight radio waves. And finally (as they used to say on Hill Street Blues), be careful out there...!!
 

charley

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I believe this is for outdoor tips. I think I'll look at hunting. My tip is to know the capabilities of your rifle before you go hunting with it. I like to go to the range and shoot so I know what my rifle will do and where it hits. I also know how much it drops. I also know ppl that never shoot their rifle except when hunting. An animal deserves better than that.
 

Hikenhunter

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Tip #21 10/23/12---- When camping along the side of a river pull your boats above the high water line and tie them down securly. I know of one group of campers who didnot do this in the Delaware Water Gap and they woke to a much higher river and no canoes. They were stranded on the island they had camped on the night before untill the national park people showed up with their canoes in tow. Turns out that a fisherman found the canoes and gathered them up, then called the rangers who then came and figured there must be stranded campers upstream. they towed the canoes upstream, all the while looking for the stranded people.
 

Grandpa

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Oct 23 Ever had a tent with a "blown zipper"? With the newer plastic zippers, nine times out of ten, it is dirt/lint in the closer that has caused it. By cleaning, many of those zippers can still function. Check the closer for any foreign matter, wipe the entire zipper with a damp cloth and you may get the zipper working again. Also, check the point where the zipper does not close. Sometimes the individual finger that is damaged can be bent back in shape with the point of a knive, a needle or other fine pointed tool.

Zipper maintainence is still the best life preserving action for that tent. Wipe the zipper periodically with a clean cloth during use and with a clean wet cloth before storing after use. (Make sure it is dry again before storing) Inspect the closer for any lint or foreign matter as well and that zipper should outlast the tent.
 

charley

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When going up high in the mountains or even out in the woods in the early spring, don't forget the sunscreen. There are no leaves on the trees for shade and few or no trees up high. Sunscreen is a good moisturizer any day.
 
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